2011/03/13 14:00 Panel on "An 'All Lands, All Owners' Approach: Urban Sustainability, Governance Theory, and Poly-Centric Networks", Resilience 2011, Arizona State University

Submitted by daviding on Sun, 07/08/2018 - 01:49

Resilience 2011 --  Resilience, Innovation and Sustainability:  Navigating the Complexities of Global Change -- Second International Science and Policy Conference -- March 11-16, 2011

This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker's presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship, by David Ing.

Introduction by Dale Blahna

  • Combining research across country

Different models on stewardship

All Lands, All Owners approach:  The management of public lands alone will not be sufficient

  • Most of panelists are with the U.S. Forestry Service, recent mission shift is towards all lands approach
  • Director points to all lands
  • New proposed planning rules, on a regional approach, linking forests with all lands and all owners, including urban areas that are much more dense than previously looked at
  • Cities: how do they plan, now
  • Polycentric

Papers

1. From Sanitary to Sustainable Cities: An emerging role and reevaluation of environmental governance and polycentric networks in cities - Michele Romolini, Kathleen Wolf, Dale Blahna

2. Causes and consequences of urban stewardship footprints over time: a socio-spatial approach - Morgan Grove, Dexter Locke, Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne, Lynn Westphal

3. Understanding urban environmental stewardship networks: Findings from citywide stewardship research in New York City, Seattle, Baltimore, and Chicago - Erika Svendsen, Dana Fisher, Lindsay Campbell, James Connolloy, Lynn Westphal, Michelle Romolini, Cherie LeBlanc Fisher, Alaka Wali

 

[1. From Sanitary to Sustainable Cities: An emerging role and reevaluation of environmental governance and polycentric networks in cities - Michele Romolini, Kathleen Wolf, Dale Blahna]

Will talk about the why of our work, on research into cities

Baltimore ecosystem study over the last century

Urban context

  • Rapid urbanization of the 1900s
  • Global changes in population from 14% in 1900 to over 50%
  • In the U.S., 81% of population, on 20% of total land
  • Living in the city may be a sustainable strategy: density, mass transit
  • NYC residen has 29% of CO2 emissions of average American

Urban accords

Past research assumed few ownership types

  • In Philadelphia, greater variety of land ownership

The Sanitary City, of the 19th century

  • Concern with health

The Sustainable City:

  • Goals will include more self-regulating

Key principles

Governance principles

Governing the Sanitary City:  First Generation Environmental Governance

  • Policies with public health concerns
  • Centralized, top-down, single media (air, water, land)
  • Assumes private ownership
  • Some success in air and watier policies

Enviornmental governance reconsidered: principles need for new governnance

1. Property

2. Reconnecting with stakeholders and resource manager: equity in benefits and burdens

3. Defining administrative rationality: institutions, regulatory rigidity of snaitary isn't what's needed

In the next century, will have mixed form polycentric networks

Research questions

  • a. Pattern = Structure of the network
  • b. Process = Interactions in the network
  • ...

[2. Causes and consequences of urban stewardship footprints over time: a socio-spatial approach - Morgan Grove, Dexter Locke, Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne, Lynn Westphal

Adding spacial and temporal complexity to network analyses

  • Causes and consequences, how did networks occur, are they acheiving their goals?
  • Spatial and temporal facts

Dimensions of complexity

  • Heterogeneity
  • Connectivity
  • Contingency (links)

Relationship between spatial structure and network structure

  • Factors endogenous to stewardship:  (i) social; (ii) ecological
  • Factors exogenous to stewardship:  spatial characteristics of patches:  overlap, adjacency, size

Relationship between temporal structure and network structure?

  • Fast/slow
  • Lags
  • Legacies

Characterizing causes and consequences

  • They don't archive, they overwrite, so need to archive for research

[3. Understanding urban environmental stewardship networks: Findings from citywide stewardship research in New York City, Seattle, Baltimore, and Chicago - Erika Svendsen, Dana Fisher, Lindsay Campbell, James Connolloy, Lynn Westphal, Michelle Romolini, Cherie LeBlanc Fisher, Alaka Wali]

Presentation switches from city to city

STEW-MAP Chicago http://stewamap.cnt.org

OasisNYC.net for New York

Seattle:  http://detpsw.washington.edu/gcra/index.shtml