Coevolving Innovations

… in Business Organizations and Information Technologies

How much for a Safari browser?

When I’m doing web development work (actually mostly editing Cascading Style Sheets), I can’t avoid that browsers render markup differently. Yes, there are standards, but there’s the market reality. Thus, although I edit using Firefox (my regular browser), I really need to check with Internet Explorer.

So, how much of the browser world does my work cover? According to statistics for December 2006 from TheCounter, here’s the top 8 browsers in use (from their list of 18).

1. MSIE 6.x filled barempty bar 19691823 (70%)
2. MSIE 7.x filled barempty bar 3491913 (12%)
3. FireFox filled barempty bar 3070730 (11%)
4. Safari filled barempty bar 830311 (3%)
5. MSIE 5.x filled barempty bar 367278 (1%)
6. Unknown filled barempty bar 254895 (1%)
7. Opera x.x filled barempty bar 163697 (1%)
8. Netscape 7.x empty bar 98265 (0%)

Gee, I’m going to have start checking with IE7, because I’m still at IE6! In addition, I didn’t realize that Firefox users are still so much in the minority!

The nagging challenge that I’ve had for some years, however, is Safari. That’s the standard browser on the Mac OS X. In the systems science community, there has always been a few notable Mac users. (There’s a motivator to a webmaster when the president of the society reports browser problems!)

I got a used Power Mac G3 — maybe three years ago — at a lawn sale at the neighbour two north from us. It’s become Diana’s computer, now with a huge 19-inch screen. As an older Mac, however, it runs Mac OS 9, which doesn’t support newfangled browsers. It does run Netscape 7, which would tend to explain the 8th place position on the ranking above.1

Thus, I’ve been watching for a bargain on an OS/X Mac for some time. I’ve had a filtered feed on the Toronto Craigslist computer category … and an opportunity came up.

I’m now the proud owner of a Powerbook G3 (a Lombard 333), with a Motorola 802.11g card. It’s installed with OS X Update 10.3.9 and looks practically new. The previous owner said that the battery died about a year ago — it works fine when plugged in — but I know that a replacement battery is about $150 (or $80 on eBay).

Right now, the computer is up in Noah and Ryan’s bedroom. We do live, however, in a house where the number of computers now outnumbers the number of occupants. I don’t expect the computer to get a huge amount of use, but it’s nice to have.

One irony is that looking inside, it has an IBM-labelled disk drive, as well as the IBM-manufactured PowerPC. It has more IBM components than the current PC you can buy with an IBM logo on it.

Oh yeah. It cost me $200CAD.


1 Correcting myself: My memory was that Power Mac G3 couldn’t be updated to OS X. Looking at the description at LowEndMac, it turns out that an upgrade is technically possible. I think that I concluded some time ago that upgrading wouldn’t be worth it, because the cost of the operating system would be near the price we paid for the hardware in the first place. That was $200, too, a few years back.

2 Comments


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • RSS qoto.org/@daviding (Mastodon)

  • RSS on IngBrief

    • 1969, 1981 Emery, System Thinking: Selected Readings
      Social Systems Science graduate students in 1970s-1980s with #RussellAckoff, #EricTrist + #HasanOzbehkhan at U. Pennsylvania Wharton School were assigned the Penguin paperback #SystemsThinking reader edited by #FredEEmery, with updated editions evolving contents.
    • 1968 Buckley, “Modern Systems Research for the Behavioral Scientist: A Sourcebook”
      Resurfacing 1968 Buckley, “Modern Systems Research for the Behavioral Scientist: A Sourcebook” for interests in #SystemsThinking #SocioCybernetics #GeneralSystemsTheory #OrganizationScience . Republication in 2017 hardcopy may be more complete.
    • Wholism, reductionism (Francois, 2004)
      Proponents of #SystemsThinking often espouse holism to counter over-emphasis on reductionism. Reading some definitions from an encyclopedia positions one in the context of the other (François 2004).
    • It matters (word use)
      Saying “it doesn’t matter” or “it matters” is a common expression in everyday English. For scholarly work, I want to “keep using that word“, while ensuring it means what I want it to mean. The Oxford English Dictionary (third edition, March 2001) has three entries for “matter”. The first two entries for a noun. The […]
    • Systemic Change, Systematic Change, Systems Change (Reynolds, 2011)
      It's been challenging to find sources that specifically define two-word phrases -- i.e. "systemic change", "systematic change", "systems change" -- as opposed to loosely inferring reductively from one-word definitions in recombination. MartinReynolds @OpenUniversity clarifies uses of the phrases, with a critical eye into motives for choosing a specific label, as well as associated risks and […]
    • Environmental c.f. ecological (Francois, 2004; Allen, Giampietro Little 2003)
      The term "environmental" can be mixed up with "ecological", when the meanings are different. We can look at the encyclopedia definitions (François 2004), and then compare the two in terms of applied science (i.e. engineering with (#TimothyFHAllen @MarioGiampietro and #AmandaMLittle, 2003).
  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on daviding.com

    • 2020/09 Moments September 2020
      Discovering more of the neighbourhood, bicycling mostly in the mornings.
    • 2020/08 Moments August 2020
      Moderate summer temperatures in a city normally overheated with activity, residents gradually emerging as public venues opened cautiously.
    • 2020/07 Moments July 2020
      Daytimes full of new work assignment and training, evenings and weekends bicycling around downtown Toronto as it slowly reopens from pandemic.
    • 2020/06 Moments June 2020
      Most of month in Covid-19 shutdown Phase 1, so every photograph is an exterior shot. Bicycling around downtown Toronto, often exercising after sunset.
    • 2020/05 Moments May 2020
      Life at home is much the same with the pandemic sheltering-in-place directives, touring city streets on bicycle, avoiding the parks on weekends.
    • 2020/04 Moments April 2020
      Living in social isolation in our house with 5 family members, finishing off teaching courses and taking courses.
  • RSS on Media Queue

  • Meta

  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal