Coevolving Innovations

… in Business Organizations and Information Technologies

Currently Viewing Posts Tagged creative class

Talent in the (new) service economy: creative class occupations?

I had previously written that “the (new) service economy is not the same as the service sector“. There’s an deep problem in trying to define and measure something new, when we have to rely on government statistics that have an anchor point of 1980, 1971, or even 1945. Using old definitions doesn’t necessary invalidate the measurements, but is problem if we’re dealing with a paradigm shift in a scientific revolution.

In quantifying economic systems, many of the approaches take an output-oriented (i.e. GDP or value-added) approach. Another alternative is to take an input-oriented approach (i.e. labour). Looking into labour has brought me back to Richard Florida’s research. In The Rise of the Creative Class (2002) appears a breakdown of U.S. statistics that contrast to the three-sector view.

Appendix Table 1 Counting the Classes, 1999 [p. 330]1

Share Employees (OES data) Percent Share Employees (Emp. & Earnings data) Percent Share
Creative Class 38,278,110 30.0% 38,453,000 28.8%
  Super-Creative Core 14.932,420 11.7% 14,133,000 10.6%
  Other Creative Class 23.345,690 18.3% 24,320,000 18.2%
Working Class 33,238,810 26.1% 32.760,000 24.5%
Service Class 55,293,720 43.4% 58,837,000 44.1%
Agriculture 463,360 0.4% 3,426,000 2.6%
  Total 127,274,000   133,488,000  

Why does the view of occupations as super-creative core and other creative class matter? From The Flight of the Creative Class in 2004, creative class occupations are shown to drive disproportionate amounts of wealth generation in the U.S. (Their creative sector I’ll frame as “new” service economy occupations, to contrast from their service sector as traditional service economy occupations).

I had previously written that “the (new) service economy is not the same as the service sector“. There’s an deep problem in trying to define and measure something new, when we have to rely on government statistics that have an anchor point of 1980, 1971, or even 1945. Using old definitions doesn’t necessary invalidate the measurements, but is problem if we’re dealing with a paradigm shift in a scientific revolution.

In quantifying economic systems, many of the approaches take an output-oriented (i.e. GDP or value-added) approach. Another alternative is to take an input-oriented approach (i.e. labour). Looking into labour has brought me back to Richard Florida’s research. In The Rise of the Creative Class (2002) appears a breakdown of U.S. statistics that contrast to the three-sector view.

Appendix Table 1 Counting the Classes, 1999 [p. 330]1

Share Employees (OES data) Percent Share Employees (Emp. & Earnings data) Percent Share
Creative Class 38,278,110 30.0% 38,453,000 28.8%
  Super-Creative Core 14.932,420 11.7% 14,133,000 10.6%
  Other Creative Class 23.345,690 18.3% 24,320,000 18.2%
Working Class 33,238,810 26.1% 32.760,000 24.5%
Service Class 55,293,720 43.4% 58,837,000 44.1%
Agriculture 463,360 0.4% 3,426,000 2.6%
  Total 127,274,000   133,488,000  

Why does the view of occupations as super-creative core and other creative class matter? From The Flight of the Creative Class in 2004, creative class occupations are shown to drive disproportionate amounts of wealth generation in the U.S. (Their creative sector I’ll frame as “new” service economy occupations, to contrast from their service sector as traditional service economy occupations).

  • RSS qoto.org/@daviding (Mastodon)

  • RSS on IngBrief

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on daviding.com

    • 2019/12 Moments December 2019
      First half of December in finishing up course assignments and preparing for exams; second half on 11-day family vacation in Mexico City.
    • 2019/11 Moments November 2019
      Wrapped up paperwork on closing out family buildings in Gravenhurst, returned to classes and technical conferences in usual pattern of learning.
    • 2019/10 Moments October 2019
      Tightly scheduled weekdays at Ryerson Chang School, weekends in Gravenhurst clearing out family building as we're leaving the town permanently.
    • 2019/09 Moments September 2019
      Full month, winding down family business in Gravenhurst, starting Ryerson Chang certificate program in Big Data, with scheduled dinners with family and friends.
    • 2019/08 Moments August 2018
      Enjoyed summer with events in Toronto, followed by trips back my home town Gravenhurst, staying overnight for the first time in over 30 years.
    • 2019/07 Moments July 2019
      Busy month of living every day of the summer to the fullest, visiting family and friends, enjoying the local sights of the city.
  • RSS on Media Queue

  • Meta

  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal